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Activity Group3

Theorizing Asia-The Development of Post-Western IR Theory

Activity Group3
2012/03/24

O.P. Jindai Global University 

 

‘Theorizing Asia-The Development of Post-Western IR Theory’

 

Date:February 24, 2012 

Venue:O.P.Jindal Global University (India)

 

 

SESSION ONE (13:10-15:10) OVERVIEWING POST-WESTERN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS


Chair Dr. Young Chul Cho (O.P. Jindal Global University)


Keynote Presentations


Professor Navnita Chadha Behera (Delhi University)
‘Doing “IR” in India: A “Realist” Past and Future Alternatives’


Dr. Giorgiandrea Shani (International Christian University)
‘The Promise of Post-Western IR: Religion, Identity and Human Security’


Professor Kosuke Shimizu (Ryukoku University)
‘Materialising the "Non-Western": Two Stories of Kyoto School Philosophers
on Culture and Politics’


Discussants
Dr. Ching Chang Chen (Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University)
Dr. Josuke Ikeda (O.P. Jindal Global University)

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SESSION TWO (15:30-17:30) EMERGING POST-WESTERN IR – COUNTRY PERSPECTIVES


Chair Dr. Josuke Ikeda (O.P. Jindal Global University)


Presentations


Dr. Siddharth Mallavarapu (Jawaharlal Nehru University)
‘International Relations in India: Notes on Theory’


Dr. Ching Chang Chen (Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University)
‘The "Loss" of Ryukyu Revisited: China's No Use of Compellence in the Sino-
Japanese Border Dispute, 1879-1880’


Dr. Kelvin Cheung (Manchester University)
‘Between Empirical and Normative Theory: Rethinking Confucian Pacifism
and the Role of Ethics in International Security’


Discussants
Prof. Kosuke Shimizu (Ryukoku University)
Dr. Young Chul Cho (O.P. Jindal Global University)

 

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Presented here is Group 3’s sixth research meeting entitled “Theorizing Asia: The Development of Post-Western IR” at O.P. Jindal Global University in India.

In the current stage of globalization, a widening gap is emerging between mainstream, western-centric theories of IR and today’s international phenomena found in Asia. Based on this subject, this workshop had two major purposes. One was to polish further the result of what all the participants had done in recent years. The other was to make an intellectual link between the views of East Asia and South Asia. This workshop was also aimed at historical explorations based on Asian contexts.

Starting the keynote presentation entitled “Doing ‘IR’ in India: A ‘Realist’ Past and Future Alternatives,” Dr. Navnita Chadha Behera (Delhi University) gave a review of Indian IR and criticized the fact that the realist tradition dominates IR writings in conventional research. In order to deal with this problem, she insisted, we must bring some alternative Indian voices to the IR discipline.

Dr. Giorgiandrea Shani (International Christian University) gave the second lecture on “The Promise of Post-Western IR: Religion, Identity and Human Security.” Dr. Shani criticized western IR with reference to conventional theories of human security. Dr. Shani advocated that a “post-western” concept of human security should be sought instead that recognizes multiple religious and cultural contexts in which human dignity is firmly embedded.

Dr. Kosuke Shimizu (Ryukoku University) gave the third keynote lecture entitled “Two Stories of Kyoto School Philosophers on Culture and Politics.” Dr. Shimizu re-examined the political and cultural theories of Kyoto School’s intellectuals during World War II. Particularly regarding Jun Tosaka’s theory, he examined why Tosaka ended up with an opposite viewpoint from Nishida, despite their common understanding of philosophy.

In the next session “Emerging Post-Western IR: Country Perspectives,” three reports were presented: “International Relations in India: Notes on Theory” by Dr. Siddharth Mallavarapu (Jawaharlal Nehru University); “The Loss of Ryukyu Revisited: China’s No Use of Compellence in the Sino-Japanese Border Dispute, 1879-1880” by Dr. Ching Chang Chen (Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University); and “Between Empirical and Normative Theory: Rethinking Confucian Pacifism and the Role of Ethics in International Security” by Dr. Kelvin Cheung (Manchester University).

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